Marion's Faith.

      Charles King
Marions Faith.

Excerpt: ...evening it had disappeared behind a prominent headland far up a valley farther to the south, and probably had there gone into camp for the night. Late this night they get the news that gives rise to vast speculation and some genuine anxiety. Runners come in who say that instead of camping there, the White Chief rode all night; turned northward soon as it was dark; crossed this very valley far above them at dawn, and where he went from there they couldn't say. They dare not follow. Was it possible the White Chief was going to beat them at their own tactics? Could it be that he was going to head them off? Attack them in the early morning far to the northwest? Lying on the ground, the officers heard many hoof-beats dying away in the distance, and wondered what it might mean. It meant that some fifty of their foemen had galloped away to look for their families and the rest of the band, and warn them of the new danger. It was more than certain that no help could come to the soldiers in the Pg 225 valley; but they must guard their people against this mysterious move. At daybreak those left behind would resume the effort to dislodge the soldiers, and then there would be a revel. And daybreak comes all too soon. Far to the east the stars are paling, and a grayish veil rises slowly from the horizon. One by one the night-lamps in the heavens lose their sparkle and radiance, as the filament of the dawn shrouds and stifles them. Far down the valley tumbling outlines of ridge and height are carved out in sharper relief against the lightening sky. There is a stir in the leaves o'erhead and the soft rustle of the morning breeze. Presently the pallid veil at the east takes on a purplish blush, that is changing every instant to a ruddier hue. Faces are beginning to be dimly visible in the groups of defenders, pinched and drawn and cold in the nipping air, and Wayne notes with a half sob how blue poor Dana's lips are. The boy's thoughts are far away. Is he...

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    The Mountain Divide

      Frank H. Spearman
The Mountain Divide

Frank H. Spearman was an early 20th century American author best known for books about the West, and particularly about railroads. His works were some of the most vivid depictions of the mid-19th century expansion across the frontier.

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    The Desert Fiddler

      William H. Hamby
The Desert Fiddler

The Desert Fiddler is presented here in a high quality paperback edition. This popular classic work by William H. (William Henry) Hamby is in the English language, and may not include graphics or images from the original edition. If you enjoy the works of William H. (William Henry) Hamby then we highly recommend this publication for your book collection.

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